Difference between revisions of "Journal:An integrated data analytics platform"

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==Abstract==  
 
==Abstract==  
An integrated science data analytics platform (ISDAP) is an environment that enables the confluence of resources for scientific investigation. It harmonizes data, tools, and computational resources to enable the research community to focus on the investigation rather than spending time on security, data preparation, management, etc. OceanWorks is a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) technology integration project to establish a [[Cloud computing|cloud-based]] integrated ocean science [[Data analysis|data analytics]] platform for managing ocean science research data at NASA’s Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC). The platform focuses on advancement and maturity by bringing together several NASA open-source, big data projects for parallel analytics, anomaly detection, ''in situ''-to-satellite data matching, quality-screened data subsetting, search relevancy, and data discovery. Our communities are relying on data available through [[Distributed computing|distributed data centers]] to conduct their research. In typical investigations, scientists would (1) search for data, (2) evaluate the relevance of that data, (3) download it, and (4) then apply algorithms to identify trends, anomalies, or other attributes of the data. Such a workflow cannot scale if the research involves a massive amount of data or multi-variate measurements. With the upcoming NASA Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission expected to produce over 20 petabytes (PB) of observational data during its three-year nominal mission, the volume of data will challenge all existing earth science data archival, distribution, and analysis paradigms. This paper discusses how OceanWorks enhances the analysis of physical ocean data where the computation is done on an elastic cloud platform next to the archive to deliver fast, web-accessible services for working with oceanographic measurements.
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A scientific integrated data analytics platform (IDAP) is an environment that enables the confluence of resources for scientific investigation. It harmonizes data, tools, and computational resources to enable the research community to focus on the investigation rather than spending time on security, data preparation, management, etc. OceanWorks is a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) technology integration project to establish a [[Cloud computing|cloud-based]] integrated ocean science [[Data analysis|data analytics]] platform for managing ocean science research data at NASA’s Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC). The platform focuses on advancement and maturity by bringing together several NASA open-source, big data projects for parallel analytics, anomaly detection, ''in situ''-to-satellite data matching, quality-screened data subsetting, search relevancy, and data discovery. Our communities are relying on data available through [[Distributed computing|distributed data centers]] to conduct their research. In typical investigations, scientists would (1) search for data, (2) evaluate the relevance of that data, (3) download it, and (4) then apply algorithms to identify trends, anomalies, or other attributes of the data. Such a workflow cannot scale if the research involves a massive amount of data or multi-variate measurements. With the upcoming NASA Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission expected to produce over 20 petabytes (PB) of observational data during its three-year nominal mission, the volume of data will challenge all existing earth science data archival, distribution, and analysis paradigms. This paper discusses how OceanWorks enhances the analysis of physical ocean data where the computation is done on an elastic cloud platform next to the archive to deliver fast, web-accessible services for working with oceanographic measurements.
  
 
'''Keywords''': big data, cloud computing, ocean science, data analysis, matchup, anomaly detection, open source
 
'''Keywords''': big data, cloud computing, ocean science, data analysis, matchup, anomaly detection, open source
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==Introduction==
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With increasing global temperature, warming of the ocean, and melting of ice sheets and glaciers, numerous impacts can be observed. From changes in anomalous ocean temperature and circulation patterns to increasing extreme weather events and more intense tropical cyclones, sea level rise and storm surge affecting coastlines can be observed, and with them drastic changes and shifts in marine ecosystems. To date, science investigating these phenomena requires researchers to work with a disjointed collection of tools such as search, reprojection, visualization, subsetting, and statistical analysis. Researchers are finding themselves having to convert nomenclature between these tools, including something as mundane as dataset name and representation of geospatial coordinates. Researchers are also at times required to transform the data into a more common representation in order to correlate measurements collected from different instruments. To solve this disjointed data research problem, the concept of an integrated data analytics platform (IDAP) (Figure 1) may help tackle these data wrangling, [[Information management|management]], and [[Data analysis|analysis]] challenges so researchers can focus on their investigation.
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[[File:Fig1 Armstrong FrontMarineSci2019 6.jpg|1300px]]
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  | style="background-color:white; padding-left:10px; padding-right:10px;"| <blockquote>'''Figure 1.''' An integrated data analytics platform</blockquote>
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In recent years, NASA’s Advanced Information Systems Technology (AIST) and Advancing Collaborating Connections for Earth System Science (ACCESS) programs have invested in developing new technologies targeting big ocean data on [[cloud computing]] platforms. Their goal is to address some of the challenges of managing oceanographic big data by leveraging modern computing infrastructure and horizontal-scale software methodologies. Rather than developing a single ocean data analysis application, we have developed a data service platform to enable many analytic applications and lay the foundation for community-driven oceanography research.
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OceanWorks<ref name="HuangHigh18">{{cite journal |title=High Performance Open-Source Big Ocean Science Platform (OD51A-07) |journal=2018 Ocean Sciences Meeting |author=Huang, T.; Armstrong, E.M.; Greguska, F.R. et al. |year=2018 |url=https://agu.confex.com/agu/os18/meetingapp.cgi/Paper/314599}}</ref> is a NASA AIST project to mature NASA’s recent investments through integrated technologies and to provide the oceanographic community with a range of useful and advanced data manipulation and analytics capabilities. As an IDAP, OceanWorks harmonizes data, tools, and computational resources to enable oceanographers to focus on the investigation rather than spending time on security, data preparation, management, etc. Oceanographers have become increasingly frustrated with the growing number of research tool silos and their lack of coherence. A user might use one tool to search data sets and then must manually translate the dataset name, time, and spatial extends in order to satisfy the nomenclature of yet another tool (e.g., subsetting tool). To address this frustration, OceanWorks was developed to implement an IDAP for oceanographers. This platform is designed to be extensible and promote community contribution by providing an integrated collection of features, including:
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* data analysis;
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* data-Intensive anomaly detection;
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* distributed ''in situ''-to-satellite data matching;
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* search relevancy;
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* quality-screened data subsetting; and
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* upload-and-execute custom parallel analytic algorithms.
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In 2017 the OceanWorks project team donated all of the project’s source code to the Apache Software Foundation and established the official [http://sdap.apache.org/ Science Data Analytics Platform (SDAP) project] for community-driven development of the cloud-based data access and analysis platform. Today, the OceanWorks project is still in active development but through the open-source paradigm.
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==OceanWorks components==
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==References==
 
==References==
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==Notes==
 
==Notes==
This presentation is faithful to the original, with only a few minor changes to presentation, grammar, and punctuation. In some cases important information was missing from the references, and that information was added.
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This presentation is faithful to the original, with only a few minor changes to presentation, grammar, and punctuation for improved readability. In some cases important information was missing from the references, and that information was added. The singular footnote was turned into an inline link.
  
 
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Revision as of 19:17, 9 September 2019

Full article title An integrated data analytics platform
Journal Frontiers in Marine Science
Author(s) Armstrong, Edward M.; Bourassa, Mark A.; Cram, Thomas A.; DeBellis, Maya; Elya, Jocelyn; Greguska III, Frank R.;
Huang, Thomas; Jacob, Joseph C.; Ji, Zaihua; Jiang, Yongyao; Li, Yun; Quach, Nga; McGibbney, Lewis; Smith, Shawn;
Tsontos, Vardis M.; Wilson, Brian; Worley, Steven J.; Yang, Chaowei; Yam, Elizabeth
Author affiliation(s) NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies, National Center for Atmospheric Research,
George Mason University
Primary contact Email: thomas dot huang at jpl dot nasa dot gov
Year published 2019
Volume and issue 6
Page(s) 354
DOI 10.3389/fmars.2019.00354
ISSN 2296-7745
Distribution license Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
Website https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2019.00354/full
Download https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2019.00354/pdf (PDF)

Abstract

A scientific integrated data analytics platform (IDAP) is an environment that enables the confluence of resources for scientific investigation. It harmonizes data, tools, and computational resources to enable the research community to focus on the investigation rather than spending time on security, data preparation, management, etc. OceanWorks is a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) technology integration project to establish a cloud-based integrated ocean science data analytics platform for managing ocean science research data at NASA’s Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC). The platform focuses on advancement and maturity by bringing together several NASA open-source, big data projects for parallel analytics, anomaly detection, in situ-to-satellite data matching, quality-screened data subsetting, search relevancy, and data discovery. Our communities are relying on data available through distributed data centers to conduct their research. In typical investigations, scientists would (1) search for data, (2) evaluate the relevance of that data, (3) download it, and (4) then apply algorithms to identify trends, anomalies, or other attributes of the data. Such a workflow cannot scale if the research involves a massive amount of data or multi-variate measurements. With the upcoming NASA Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission expected to produce over 20 petabytes (PB) of observational data during its three-year nominal mission, the volume of data will challenge all existing earth science data archival, distribution, and analysis paradigms. This paper discusses how OceanWorks enhances the analysis of physical ocean data where the computation is done on an elastic cloud platform next to the archive to deliver fast, web-accessible services for working with oceanographic measurements.

Keywords: big data, cloud computing, ocean science, data analysis, matchup, anomaly detection, open source

Introduction

With increasing global temperature, warming of the ocean, and melting of ice sheets and glaciers, numerous impacts can be observed. From changes in anomalous ocean temperature and circulation patterns to increasing extreme weather events and more intense tropical cyclones, sea level rise and storm surge affecting coastlines can be observed, and with them drastic changes and shifts in marine ecosystems. To date, science investigating these phenomena requires researchers to work with a disjointed collection of tools such as search, reprojection, visualization, subsetting, and statistical analysis. Researchers are finding themselves having to convert nomenclature between these tools, including something as mundane as dataset name and representation of geospatial coordinates. Researchers are also at times required to transform the data into a more common representation in order to correlate measurements collected from different instruments. To solve this disjointed data research problem, the concept of an integrated data analytics platform (IDAP) (Figure 1) may help tackle these data wrangling, management, and analysis challenges so researchers can focus on their investigation.

Fig1 Armstrong FrontMarineSci2019 6.jpg

Figure 1. An integrated data analytics platform

In recent years, NASA’s Advanced Information Systems Technology (AIST) and Advancing Collaborating Connections for Earth System Science (ACCESS) programs have invested in developing new technologies targeting big ocean data on cloud computing platforms. Their goal is to address some of the challenges of managing oceanographic big data by leveraging modern computing infrastructure and horizontal-scale software methodologies. Rather than developing a single ocean data analysis application, we have developed a data service platform to enable many analytic applications and lay the foundation for community-driven oceanography research.

OceanWorks[1] is a NASA AIST project to mature NASA’s recent investments through integrated technologies and to provide the oceanographic community with a range of useful and advanced data manipulation and analytics capabilities. As an IDAP, OceanWorks harmonizes data, tools, and computational resources to enable oceanographers to focus on the investigation rather than spending time on security, data preparation, management, etc. Oceanographers have become increasingly frustrated with the growing number of research tool silos and their lack of coherence. A user might use one tool to search data sets and then must manually translate the dataset name, time, and spatial extends in order to satisfy the nomenclature of yet another tool (e.g., subsetting tool). To address this frustration, OceanWorks was developed to implement an IDAP for oceanographers. This platform is designed to be extensible and promote community contribution by providing an integrated collection of features, including:

  • data analysis;
  • data-Intensive anomaly detection;
  • distributed in situ-to-satellite data matching;
  • search relevancy;
  • quality-screened data subsetting; and
  • upload-and-execute custom parallel analytic algorithms.

In 2017 the OceanWorks project team donated all of the project’s source code to the Apache Software Foundation and established the official Science Data Analytics Platform (SDAP) project for community-driven development of the cloud-based data access and analysis platform. Today, the OceanWorks project is still in active development but through the open-source paradigm.

OceanWorks components

References

  1. Huang, T.; Armstrong, E.M.; Greguska, F.R. et al. (2018). "High Performance Open-Source Big Ocean Science Platform (OD51A-07)". 2018 Ocean Sciences Meeting. https://agu.confex.com/agu/os18/meetingapp.cgi/Paper/314599. 

Notes

This presentation is faithful to the original, with only a few minor changes to presentation, grammar, and punctuation for improved readability. In some cases important information was missing from the references, and that information was added. The singular footnote was turned into an inline link.