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Welcome to, the laboratory, health, and science informatics encyclopedia.
Users have contributed: 1,219 articles.

LIMSwiki is a collaborative wiki dedicated to the scientific community, featuring organized, documented, and up-to-date content regarding all aspects of laboratory informatics, bioinformatics, and health informatics. LIMSwiki also strives to maintain relevant knowledge about laboratory equipment as well as commercial and open-source software likely to be used in a laboratory setting. This also includes the vendors of such equipment and software.

Like any community wiki, the value and success of LIMSwiki is dependent upon the scientific community contributing their vast knowledge through the creation of relevant articles and editing of existing articles where knowledge is absent. If you wish to enrich the content of this wiki or have something of value to add, please request an account and get started.

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Featured article of the week

Fig5 Deroulers DiagnosticPath2013 8.jpg

"Analyzing huge pathology images with open source software"

Background: Digital pathology images are increasingly used both for diagnosis and research, because slide scanners are nowadays broadly available and because the quantitative study of these images yields new insights in systems biology. However, such virtual slides build up a technical challenge since the images occupy often several gigabytes and cannot be fully opened in a computer’s memory. Moreover, there is no standard format. Therefore, most common open source tools such as ImageJ fail at treating them, and the others require expensive hardware while still being prohibitively slow.

Results: We have developed several cross-platform open source software tools to overcome these limitations. The NDPITools provide a way to transform microscopy images initially in the loosely supported NDPI format into one or several standard TIFF files, and to create mosaics (division of huge images into small ones, with or without overlap) in various TIFF and JPEG formats. They can be driven through ImageJ plugins. The LargeTIFFTools achieve similar functionality for huge TIFF images which do not fit into RAM. We test the performance of these tools on several digital slides and compare them, when applicable, to standard software. A statistical study of the cells in a tissue sample from an oligodendroglioma was performed on an average laptop computer to demonstrate the efficiency of the tools. (Full article...)

Recently featured: iLAP: A workflow-driven software for experimental protocol development, data acquisition and analysisThe evolution, use, and effects of integrated personal health records: A narrative review, Undertaking sociotechnical evaluations of health information technologies

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Key commercial laboratory informatics vendors

What does it mean to be "key" for the purpose of this ranking? The criterion for a vendor selling proprietary commercial laboratory informatics software being listed here: the vendor's LIMSwiki page must have a cited (from a publicly-available source) price list. Those with demonstration videos are given higher preference; items ranked by number of videos. Go here for all listed vendors in the wiki.

Laboratory informatics software and products
Key cloud- or SaaS-based laboratory informatics software

Listed below are key commercial and open-source laboratory informatics software offerings listed in the wiki that utilize the cloud or software as a service (SaaS) model. "Key" indicates vendor's (or software's) LIMSwiki page has a cited (from a publicly-available source) price list. Those with demonstration videos are given higher preference; items ranked by number of videos.

1. LabKey Server via LabKey Corporation
2. webLIMS and Health Cloud Hub via LabLynx, Inc.
3. Bika LIMS via Bika Lab Systems (Pty) Ltd.
4. Scilligence ELN via Scilligence Corporation
5. LabArchives via LabArchives, LLC
6. eCAT via Research Innovations Limited
7. labfolder via labfolder GmbH
8. Labguru via BioData Inc.
9. LabVantage 7 via LabVantage Solutions, Inc.
10. NevisLIMS via Instrumentos Científicos SA
11. NoteBookMaker via NoteBookMaker, LLC

12. Sysment Notebook via Sysment Kft.
13. BioRails DM via The Edge Software Consultancy Ltd.
14. GENEIO via BioSistemika LLC
15. LABTrack via LABTrack, LLC
16. BioTracer via, LLC
17. limsExpress via Dynamic Databases, LLC
18. iLIS via Margy Tech Pvt. Ltd.
19. Element LIMS via Promium, LLC
20. SDMS Software via SDMSSoft, LLC
21. Datacloud via SPLhost, Inc.
22. hivebench via shazino SAS

Open-source software

Looking for open-source software solutions to make your lab or office more efficient? Try these locations:

Additional LIMSwiki resources
Open-source laboratory informatics software

Listed below are some of the most active and supported open-source laboratory informatics software projects with articles in the wiki, as of May 2014. Go here for all listed open-source laboratory informatics projects.

Additional information
Latest news

June 15, 2015:

Sourceforge logo.png

I've been following the antics of open-source hosting site SourceForge for several years now, wanting to give them a chance to turn a sinking ship around with better, more community-friendly tactics. However, it's become clear to me within the last week that the people running the site have fully managed to drive the site off the cliff, never to return to respectability. The site has been packing crappy add-ons and bloatware with select popular software packages for quite some time, but lately the site owners have gone too far. While the need to monetize the site to pay for hosting seems reasonable, the owners of the site have gotten out of hand. (Actually, they don't even pay that much for hosting, if anything, depending on the generosity of others to mirror the site.)

Major projects have been leaving SourceForge in droves, but that hasn't stopped the SourceForge team from doing more harm: they resorted to taking over abandoned accounts and repackaging software with malware, etc. Calls for other projects to leave SourceForge have gotten louder over the past few days, with the team of well-regarded text editor Notepad++ being the latest to leave while encouraging others to do the same.

We've been linking directly to SourceForge pages for most of our open-source software pages, but that will now end. External links to SourceForge on open-source pages will be removed, though a text comment will remain if the project can ONLY be found on SourceForge. It will then be up to the user to decide to visit SourceForge and search for the project there. We do not wish for LIMSwiki users to fall prey to their unfriendly tactics, thus the changes. (Clarification: SourceForge-based citations used to document history will remain, per wiki policy. Only external stand-alone links are being removed.)

Shawn Douglas (talk) 18:24, 15 June 2015 (UTC)

May 18, 2015:

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In early May this year we surpassed 1,000,000 page views of LIMSwiki's front page! Sure, that probably mixes in a fair amount of bot indexing and personal updating and reference of the front page, but we're still happy to see that number rise.

I personally started working on the wiki on April 15, 2011, and just over four years later we're still getting plenty of eyes on the site. Admittedly, other projects have taken away some of my time from contributions; however, there's still a boatload of work to be done, from page additions to formatting updates. Like any good wiki, it's always a work in progress. We hope you've all gotten good use out of it and will continue to benefit from new additions as they arrive.

Shawn Douglas (talk) 16:42, 18 May 2015 (UTC)

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