3D Slicer

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3D Slicer
3DSlicerLogo.png
Original author(s) David Gering[1]
Developer(s) Steve Pieper, Isomics, Kitware, and the 3D Slicer community[2]
Initial release 2000 (2000) (1.0.0)[3][4]
Stable release

5.0.1  (May 1, 2022; 8 months ago (2022-05-01))

[±]
Preview release none [±]
Written in C, C++[1]
Operating system Linux, MacOS X, Windows
Type Imaging informatics software
License(s) BDS-style
Website https://www.slicer.org/

3D Slicer is free open-source extensible image processing software for the analysis and visualization of medical images. The software is not restricted in its use, though the developers note that it's not approved by the FDA for clinical use.[5]

Product history

3D Slicer was first conceived by David Gering, an MIT graduate student, as part of a master's thesis project in 1998 and 1999.[6] Teaming up with the Surgical Planning Laboratory at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, Gering and the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory developed 3D Slicer as a "community-based platform created for the purpose of subject-specific image analysis and visualization."[1] The two entities continued work on the software, which as early as 2000 was made open-source and freely available via an FTP server.[3] By early 2007, the download and contribution process modernized to allow direct download and access to repositories without initial registration.[7]

By 2015, new inventive uses for 3D Slicer were being described, including the 3D printing of models using imaging data for both surgical planning[8] and personal use.[9]

Funding

3D Slicer development is funded in part by the National Institutes of Health through numerous research and development projects.[2]

Versions

The following stable and beta versions of 3D Slicer are known to have been released:

  • 1.0.0 - 2000[3][4]
  • 1.2.2 - 30 May 2001[4]
  • 1.2.3 - 25 February 2002[4]
  • 1.3.0 - March 2002[10]
  • 1.3.1 - 30 June 2002[4]
  • 2.0.0 - 04 May 2002[4][11]
  • 2.1.0 - 09 June 2003[4]
  • 2.3.0 - Unknown[4]
  • 2.4.0 - January 2005[10]
  • 2.5.0 - May 2005[10]
  • 2.6.0 - May 2006[10]
  • 3.0.0 Beta - January 2007[7][5]
  • 3.0.0 - 17 January 2008[12]
  • 3.2.0 - 08 August 2008[12]
  • 3.4.0 - 21 May 2009[12][5]
  • 3.4.1 - 15 October 2009[12]
  • 3.4.2 - 06 January 2010[12]
  • 3.4.3 - 15 April 2010[12]
  • 3.6.0 - 10 June 2010[12][5]
  • 3.6.1 - 16 August 2010[12][5]
  • 3.6.2 - 03 November 2010[12]
  • 3.6.3 - 04 March 2011[12][5]
  • 4.0.0 Beta - 18 December 2010[13]
  • 4.0.0 - 27 November 2011[5][13]
  • 4.0.1 - 06 January 2012[13]
  • 4.1.0 - 12 April 2012[5][13]
  • 4.1.1 - 01 June 2012[13]
  • 4.2.0 - 31 October 2012[5][13]
  • 4.2.1 - 16 November 2012[13]
  • 4.2.2 - 07 December 2012[13]
  • 4.2.2-1 - 08 December 2012[13]
  • 4.3.0 - 04 September 2013[5][13]
  • 4.3.1 - 04 October 2012[13]
  • 4.3.1-1 - 14 November 2013[13]
  • 4.4.0 - 02 November 2014[13]
  • 4.5.0-1 - 12 November 2015[13]

Features

3D Slicer has features including:

  • support for DICOM and other image formats
  • non-linear transforms
  • visualization of transforms in 2D and 3D
  • registration and interactive segmentation of image/data
  • analysis and visualization of diffusion tensor imaging data
  • output of a filtered transform node based on tracker input
  • support for command-line interface (CLI) modules
  • extensible with numerous supported extensions

For more, see the 4.5 announcement page.

Hardware/software requirements

The system requirements for 3D Slicer include[14]:

  • Windows 7 64bit, MacOS X Lion (or Maverick, w/ update), or recent Linux distro
  • 8GB of memory
  • 1280x1024 monitor resolution
  • dedicated graphics with at least 1GB or memory
  • multi-core or multi-CPU setup useful

Videos, screenshots, and other media

Entities using 3D Slicer

Further reading



External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Jolesz, F.A. (2014). "History of Image-Guided Therapy at Brigham and Women's Hospital". In Jolesz, F.A.. Intraoperative Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy. Springer Science & Business Media. pp. 25–45. ISBN 9781461476573. https://books.google.com/books?id=-Ue9BAAAQBAJ&pg=PA25. Retrieved 25 August 2016. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 "Documentation/4.5/Acknowledgments". Surgical Planning Laboratory. http://wiki.slicer.org/slicerWiki/index.php/Documentation/4.5/Acknowledgments. Retrieved 25 August 2016. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 "3D Slicer - Get the Software". MIT. Archived from the original on 18 October 2000. https://web.archive.org/web/20001018170648/http://scooby.ai.mit.edu/. Retrieved 25 August 2016. 
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 "3D Slicer - Developer's Guide". Surgical Planning Laboratory. Archived from the original on 25 August 2016. https://web.archive.org/web/20160825190032/https://www.slicer.org/archives/devl/. Retrieved 25 August 2016. 
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 5.8 5.9 "Welcome to the 3D Slicer Wiki pages". SlicerWiki. Surgical Planning Laboratory. 27 November 2019. https://www.slicer.org/w/index.php/Main_Page. Retrieved 19 September 2021. 
  6. Gering, D.T. (December 1999). "A System for Surgical Planning and Guidance using Image Fusion and Interventional MR". Massachusetts Institute of Technology. http://www.spl.harvard.edu/publications/item/view/1040. Retrieved 25 August 2016. 
  7. 7.0 7.1 "3D Slicer". Surgical Planning Laboratory. Archived from the original on 20 August 2008. https://web.archive.org/web/20080820074626/http://slicer.org/archives. Retrieved 25 August 2016. 
  8. McKenzie, S.; Aylward, S.; Fillion-Robin, J.-C. (15 January 2015). "Efforts to Advance Field of Surgical Planning". Kitware Blog. Kitware, Inc. https://blog.kitware.com/efforts-to-advance-field-of-surgical-planning/. Retrieved 25 August 2016. 
  9. Ibáñez, L. (14 January 2015). "3D Print Your Medical Scan". Make:. Maker Media, Inc. http://makezine.com/projects/make-42/3d-print-your-medical-scan/. Retrieved 25 August 2016. 
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.3 "3D Slicer - Get the Software". Surgical Planning Laboratory. Archived from the original on 24 July 2015. https://web.archive.org/web/20150724043235/http://www.slicer.org/archives/download/index.html. Retrieved 25 August 2016. 
  11. Pieper, S. (4 May 2002). "slicer-devel slicer2 cvs uploaded". slicer-devel mailing list. Harvard. http://massmail.spl.harvard.edu/public-archives/slicer-devel/2002/020398.html. Retrieved 25 August 2016. 
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 12.3 12.4 12.5 12.6 12.7 12.8 12.9 "Index of /slicer3-downloads/Release/win32". Surgical Planning Laboratory. https://www.slicer.org/slicer3-downloads/Release/win32/. Retrieved 25 August 2016. 
  13. 13.00 13.01 13.02 13.03 13.04 13.05 13.06 13.07 13.08 13.09 13.10 13.11 13.12 13.13 "Release Details". SlicerWiki. Surgical Planning Laboratory. 16 November 2015. https://www.slicer.org/slicerWiki/index.php/Release_Details. Retrieved 25 August 2016. 
  14. "Documentation/Nightly/SlicerApplication/HardwareConfiguration". Surgical Planning Laboratory. https://www.slicer.org/slicerWiki/index.php/Documentation/Nightly/SlicerApplication/HardwareConfiguration. Retrieved 25 August 2016.