Apache Tomcat

From LIMSWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Apache Tomcat
Tomcat-logo.svg
Developer(s) Apache Software Foundation
Initial release December 16, 1999 (1999-12-16)[1][2]
Stable release

7.0.105  (July 2, 2020; 3 months ago (2020-07-02))

[±]
Preview release none [±]
Written in Java
Operating system Cross-platform
Type HTTP web server
Software development tool
License(s) Apache License 2.0
Website Tomcat.Apache.org

Apache Tomcat (or simply Tomcat; formerly also Jakarta Tomcat) is an open-source web server and servlet container developed by the Apache Software Foundation. Tomcat implements the Java Servlet and the JavaServer Pages (JSP) specifications from Oracle Corporation, and it provides a "pure Java" HTTP web server environment for Java code to run.

Tomcat should not be confused with the Apache web server, which is a C implementation of an HTTP web server; these two web servers are not bundled together, although they are frequently used together as part of a server application stack. Apache Tomcat includes tools for configuration and management, but can also be configured by editing XML configuration files.

Product history

Tomcat has its origins as a servlet reference implementation by James Duncan Davidson, a software architect at Sun Microsystems. He later helped make the project open-source and played a key role in its donation by Sun to the Apache Software Foundation in 1999.[3] The Apache Ant software build automation tool was developed as a side-effect of the creation of Tomcat as an open-source project.

Davidson had initially hoped that the project would become open and, since many open-source projects had O'Reilly books associated with them featuring an animal on the cover, he wanted to name the project after an animal. He came up with Tomcat since he reasoned the animal represented something that could fend for itself. Although the tomcat was already in use for another O'Reilly title, his wish to see an animal cover eventually came true when O'Reilly published their Tomcat book with a snow leopard on the cover.[4][5]

Tomcat's first stable release was with version 3.0 on December 16, 1999.[1][2] The project made relatively steady progress with released until it stalled out after the release of version 6.0 in February 2007.[1] A beta version of 7.0.0 was finally released on June 29, 2010, featuring new support for the Servlet 3.0, JSP 2.2 and EL 2.2 specifications.[6] The first stable release of the Tomcat 7 branch finally arrived in January 2011.[7]

Features

Tomcat 7.x implements the Servlet 3.0 and JSP 2.2 specifications. Versions 5 through 6 saw improvements in garbage collection, JSP parsing, performance and scalability. Native wrappers, known as "Tomcat Native," are available for Microsoft Windows and Unix for platform integration.

Hardware/software requirements

Tomcat requires Java version 1.6, although previous versions have run on Java 1.1 through 1.5.

Videos, screenshots, and other media

You can see a few screenshots related to Tomcat on the Software Informer site.

A few tutorial videos for Tomcat can be found on Ranny1969's YouTube channel.

Entities using Tomcat

Further reading

External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Brittain, Jason (14 January, 2011). "Tomcat 7 Voted Stable, Tomcat 6 No Longer the Latest Stable". MuleSoft. http://blogs.mulesoft.org/tomcat-7-voted-stable-tomcat-6-no-longer-the-latest-stable/. Retrieved 22 March 2012. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 Vijendran, Anil K. (16 December 1999). "Tomcat 3.0". tomcat-dev mailing list archives. The Apache Software Foundation. http://mail-archives.apache.org/mod_mbox/tomcat-dev/199912.mbox/%3cPine.SOL.3.96.991216111138.16544A-100000@tallest%3e. Retrieved 22 March 2012. 
  3. Benjamin, Dan; James Duncan Davidson (8 February 2007). "The Hivelogic Radio Show - James Duncan Davidson". Dan Benjamin. 3:28. Archived from the original on 19 February 2007. http://web.archive.org/web/20070219235411/http://hivelogic.com/podcast/episodes/james-duncan-davidson. Retrieved 22 March 2012. 
  4. Benjamin, Dan; James Duncan Davidson (8 February 2007). "The Hivelogic Radio Show - James Duncan Davidson". Dan Benjamin. 5:45. Archived from the original on 19 February 2007. http://web.archive.org/web/20070219235411/http://hivelogic.com/podcast/episodes/james-duncan-davidson. Retrieved 22 March 2012. 
  5. Brittain, Jason; Ian F. Darwin. Tomcat: The Definitive Guide. O'Reilly Books. p. 322. ISBN 0-596-00318-8. http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/tomcat/. 
  6. Taft, Darryl K. (29 June 2010). "Apache Unleashes New Tomcat Open-Source Web Server". eWEEK. http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Linux-and-Open-Source/Apache-Unleashes-New-Tomcat-OpenSource-Web-Server-618479/. Retrieved 22 March 2012. 
  7. Thomas, Mark (14 January 2011). "Apache Tomcat 7.0.6 released - the first stable Tomact 7 release". The Apache Software Foundation. https://blogs.apache.org/tomcat/entry/apache_tomcat_7_0_6. Retrieved 22 March 2012.