Archival informatics

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Archival informatics refers to the theory and application of informatics to the management and preservation of records and archives.[1] More specifically, it refers to the proper understanding and use of emerging technologies, techniques, and theories such as linguistic analysis, heuristics, and automation in the storage, manipulation, and retrieval of archives and databases.

History

The first use of informatics specifically within the field of archival science dates back to 1986 with the publication of David Bearman's Archival Informatics newsletter in 1987 and 1988. He indicated that he borrowed the term "informatics" from the field of biomedicine where "the importance of information technologies (like computers), information techniques (like full-text retrieval or digitizing radiographic images) and information theories, especially those of linguistic analysis, artificial intelligence, indexing and retrieval, are coming together in new ways of practicing medicine."[1] However, the title of the newsletter shifted to Archives and Museum Informatics in 1989, focusing more on the technological approaches to managing museums and their archives.[2]

As of 2014 the term "archival informatics" is not widely used in literature. "Museum informatics" is more commonplace.[3][4][5]

Notes

Some elements of this article are reused from the Wikipedia article.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Bearman, David (Spring 1987). "What Are/Is Informatics?" (PDF). Archival Informatics Newsletter 1 (1). http://www.archimuse.com/publishing/AMInewsletters/AMInewsletter1987_1-1.pdf. Retrieved 25 April 2014. 
  2. "Archives & Museum Informatics Newsletter (1987-1996)". Archives & Museum Informatics. http://www.archimuse.com/publishing/AMInewsletter.html. Retrieved 25 April 2014. 
  3. Marty, Paul F.; Jones, Katherine Burton (2012). Museum Informatics: People, Information, and Technology in Museums. Routledge. pp. 356. ISBN 9781135572051. http://books.google.com/books?id=4MXP7MeJKKgC&printsec=frontcover. Retrieved 25 April 2014. 
  4. "Museum Informatics Project". University of California at Berkeley. http://www.mip.berkeley.edu/. Retrieved 25 April 2014. 
  5. Marty, Paul F. (28 December 2012). "LIS 5590: Museum Informatics". Florida State University. http://marty.cci.fsu.edu/lis5590/. Retrieved 25 April 2014.