Difference between revisions of "Main Page/Featured article of the week/2020"

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<h2 style="font-size:105%; font-weight:bold; text-align:left; color:#000; padding:0.2em 0.4em; width:50%;">Featured article of the week: December 23–31:</h2>
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<h2 style="font-size:105%; font-weight:bold; text-align:left; color:#000; padding:0.2em 0.4em; width:50%;">Featured article of the week: January 2–12:</h2>
<div style="float: left; margin: 0.5em 0.9em 0.4em 0em;">[[File:Fig1 Parker DataSciJourn2019 18-1.png|240px]]</div>
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<div style="float: left; margin: 0.5em 0.9em 0.4em 0em;">[[File:Fig1 Bhattacharya FrontInOnc2019 9.jpg|240px]]</div>
'''"[[Journal:Building infrastructure for African human genomic data management|Building infrastructure for African human genomic data management]]"'''
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'''"[[Journal:AI meets exascale computing: Advancing cancer research with large-scale high-performance computing|AI meets exascale computing: Advancing cancer research with large-scale high-performance computing]]"'''
  
Human [[Genomics|genomic]] data are large and complex, and require adequate infrastructure for secure storage and transfer. The [[National Institutes of Health]] (NIH) and The Wellcome Trust have funded multiple projects on genomic research, including the Human Heredity and Health in Africa (H3Africa) initiative, and data are required to be deposited into the public domain. The European Genome-phenome Archive (EGA) is a repository for [[Sequencing|sequence]] and genotype data where data access is controlled by access committees. Access is determined by a formal application procedure for the purpose of secure storage and distribution, which must be in line with the informed consent of the study participants. H3Africa researchers based in Africa and generating their own data can benefit tremendously from the data sharing capabilities of the internet by using the appropriate technologies. The H3Africa Data Archive is an effort between the H3Africa data generating projects, H3ABioNet, and the EGA to store and submit genomic data to public repositories. ('''[[Journal:Building infrastructure for African human genomic data management|Full article...]]''')<br />
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The application of data science in [[cancer]] research has been boosted by major advances in three primary areas: (1) data: diversity, amount, and availability of biomedical data; (2) advances in [[artificial intelligence]] (AI) and machine learning (ML) algorithms that enable learning from complex, large-scale data; and (3) advances in computer architectures allowing unprecedented acceleration of simulation and machine learning algorithms. These advances help build ''in silico'' ML models that can provide transformative insights from data, including molecular dynamics simulations, [[Sequencing|next-generation sequencing]], omics, [[Molecular imaging|imaging]], and unstructured clinical text documents. Unique challenges persist, however, in building ML models related to cancer, including: (1) access, sharing, labeling, and integration of multimodal and multi-institutional data across different cancer types; (2) developing AI models for cancer research capable of scaling on next-generation high-performance computers; and (3) assessing robustness and reliability in the AI models. ('''[[Journal:AI meets exascale computing: Advancing cancer research with large-scale high-performance computing|Full article...]]''')<br />
 
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Revision as of 17:34, 14 January 2020

Featured article of the week archive - 2020

Welcome to the LIMSwiki 2020 archive for the Featured Article of the Week.

Featured article of the week: January 2–12:

Fig1 Bhattacharya FrontInOnc2019 9.jpg

"AI meets exascale computing: Advancing cancer research with large-scale high-performance computing"

The application of data science in cancer research has been boosted by major advances in three primary areas: (1) data: diversity, amount, and availability of biomedical data; (2) advances in artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) algorithms that enable learning from complex, large-scale data; and (3) advances in computer architectures allowing unprecedented acceleration of simulation and machine learning algorithms. These advances help build in silico ML models that can provide transformative insights from data, including molecular dynamics simulations, next-generation sequencing, omics, imaging, and unstructured clinical text documents. Unique challenges persist, however, in building ML models related to cancer, including: (1) access, sharing, labeling, and integration of multimodal and multi-institutional data across different cancer types; (2) developing AI models for cancer research capable of scaling on next-generation high-performance computers; and (3) assessing robustness and reliability in the AI models. (Full article...)